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Sticking your fingers into sockets to kickstart your little heart and maybe sleep a tiny bit more
batwoman: headache
coffeebased
Today, I finally finished my ticklist. It was a ridiculous few months, one that started out with me fumbling to find a system, fuck up the system, make a new system, and gradually improve at using this system. I have succeeded in finishing another major part of my graduate thesis, and I can finally face my advisor with my organized data. The writing and revision will take up the rest of my time. I am relieved that I've overcome it, and terrified because I'd gotten comfortable doing that long, hard slog.

Terrified is good because I'd rather move forward than laterally, and forward means discomfort, and fear, and improvement.

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Adult things are progressing as well.

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I've finished reading A Madness of Angels by Kate Griffin, really interesting magic but pacing was a bit difficult to keep up with. I can't help but compare it to a pile of other British urban fantasies, and find it slightly lacking in purpose and character development. I've read reviews that say the succeeding novels are better in those regards so I'll be reading the rest eventually, but not soon.

The Midnight Heir by Sarah Rees Brennan and Cassandra Clare, the latest addition to the Bane Chronicles, a spin-off of Clare's Shadowhunter series. This installment of the series is set a few years (for Magnus Bane) after The Infernal Devices, the second in CC's universe, and the one I am definitely more attached to. Due to this attachment, I spent most of the novella clasping my hands to my chest and having feelings. :)) Thing is, it felt awfully short for a novella, and more like a teaser to the fourth Shadowhunter series that CC will be releasing, the mysterious TLH.

The Lowest Heaven edited by Anne Perry "is a new anthology of contemporary science fiction published to coincide with Visions of the Universe, a major exhibition of space imagery at the Royal Observatory Greenwich" (link to the site with details about both the exhibit, the the story collection) Like most collections, there are swings and misses, but I'm glad to say that I enjoyed nearly ninety percent of this anthology. Not only are the stories written wonderfully, but they're chockfull of imagery that can stick with you for quite a while. No surprise for a collection based on the wonder of space. I tried to space it out as well as I could because these suckers are potent as fuck.

Queen of Attolia by Megan Whalen Turner, the second book in the Queen's Thief series. I really wish that I'd read this when I was a bit younger, because I could have used something that is simultaneously as cruel and clever as the characters in this book. I'll probably read the next book after a buffer of another three to four books so that I can savor this series while i can. Eugenides, Attolia, and Eddis are wonderful examples of intelligent characters who perform their responsibilities ruthlessly. I love how their mythology is a living one, as personal as a mother's tale to her child, and as present as air. :)

Codex Reborn by Jim C. Hines, is the second book in the Magic Ex Libris or Libriomancers series. It's just as geeky as the previous novel, referencing a lot of contemporary sci-fi and fantasy, but it purposefully deals with the issues I had with the previous novel. Not spoiling, as usual, but apparently the thing I had a problem with would be explicitly discussed and used in this sequel. Apparently it was foreshadowing :)) New elements were introduced, and Hines manages to integrate it nearly seamlessly. There was a mild pacing problem in the latter third of the book, but negligible in the long run, I guess. Glad I picked it up, and looking forward to next, obviously set-up, book in the series.

Soon I Will Be Invincible by Austin Grossman, is Grossman's first novel. I wanted to read it directly after I read You but decided against it because I didn't want changes or improvements in his style to bog me down when reading his first book. I'm really glad I paced myself too, because while this book is noticeably stylistically weaker than You, the break between the books helped me distance myself from it. The story features two narrators, the villain, the titular 'I', and a woman who is new to the heroing business, attacking the story from different and seemingly separate perspectives. The book is definitely one that a comic book reader will appreciate more, and I have to say that a DC reader will enjoy it most. A superhero team in the book, let's be vague to spare people who want to read it, reads a lot like the Teen Titans of Perez and Wolfman, and makes this pre-new52 reader hurt in the chest. I've just finished reading this book, so I'm still reeling from it, and really wishing that there'd be another book in this universe. It would be a bit pointless though, as this book is a lot about cycles, and while heroes and villains keep fighting, the same story keeps happening. I hope that was clear and vague at the same time :))

I've also lemmed Empire State by Adam Christopher. I pushed through half of the book before I admitted to myself that I honestly did not care about anyone in this book. Characterization was flat, pacing was super off, and while it was obvious that he was trying to do something clever with his premise, it just didn't click with me at all. :c Yeah.

Next ten books I'm reading:

1. The Blood of Tyrants by Naomi Novik
2. The Queen's Thief quartet (two down, two to go) by Megan Whalen Turner
3. The Good Man Jesus, and the Scoundrel Christ by Philip Pullman
4. Love Minus Eighty by Will McIntosh
5. The Wild Life of Our Bodies: Predators, Parasites and Partners by Rob Dunn
6. The Year of the Flood by Margaret Atwood
7. The Word for World is Forest by Ursula K. Le Guin
8. The Remains of the Day by Kazuo Ishiguro
9. Ringworld by Larry Niven
10. Feed from the Newsflesh Trilogy by Mira Grant