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her words destroyed my planet
batwoman: mask on
coffeebased
In the past few weeks, I've seen three movies I enjoyed a lot: Frozen, The Delivery Man, and The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug. I've also hung out with my friends a bit! My advisor and I met up to discuss my second draft yesterday; we had a three-hour conversation that was wonderful, and made me feel happy about my thesis. A first. :)) And I went to Inglot, which is newly-opened in Glorietta 5 x

Other stuff happened, but as usual, let's talk about books instead:

- Dangerous Women, edited by G. R. R. Martin came out. It's a short story collection about, well, what do you think? :)) And I've only read the short stories of three authors: Lev Grossman, from his Magicians series; Brandon Sanderson, from his Cosmere; and GRRM, a really long one set in his ASoIaF 'verse. I'll peck at the others when I can.


And speaking of Lev Grossman and Brandon Sanderson,

- The Magician's Land, the third novel in The Magicians series by Lev Grossman has a cover x

- Words of Radiance, the second book in The Stormlight Archive, by Brandon Sanderson has a complete manuscript and it is GIGANTIC: x and there's a 10,000 word excerpt: x.


And finally, here are Gneil and Pterry NOT discussing a Good Omens series: x


I didn't get to blog last week because of everything, including the Christmas rush, so this is two weeks' worth of reading. Also, I've got 19 days until the year ends, and I still haven't hit 150 novels. :)) UMM. It's close though. :))

Things I've read:

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A Big Hand for the Doctor by Eoin Colfer
The Nameless City by Michael Scott
The Spear of Destiny by Marcus Sedgwick
Tip of the Tongue by Patrick Ness

These four^ are from the Doctor Who 50th Anniversary E-shorts. I've decided to address all four in one go. I really enjoyed Tip but the other three were just all right for me. I'm looking forward to the other six short stories, because I am an unabashed nu!Who convert, and I have very little experience with the classic Doctors. These short stories are great bite-sized introductions to the Doctors I haven't met, and really make me want to catch up.

False Gods by Graham McNeill was further down my list, but I had to sneak it upward because I needed to know how everything was going to go down. My feelings on the events in the book are mostly just me wanting to pick up my beloved favourite characters and tell everyone else in the story that they are no longer allowed to hurt them anymore, sort of like an angry parent forbidding playground bullies to even approach their sprog. I've still got a long way to go in the Horus Heresy and I am way too compromised too early in the game.

Legion by Brandon Sanderson was the first novel in the book I gave Matthew for his birthday. I didn't mean to read it already, but his texts about it made me curious. :)) It's got a really interesting premise, and a surprise cameo from the political situation of Muslim Mindanao. I haven't read the other novel, The Emperor's Soul, but reading this made me sure that the gift I gave was an okay one.

Planet of Exile and City of Illusions by Ursula K. Le Guin are two of the latter books in the Hainish Saga in terms of publication, but in the context of the series' chronology, are the second and third, respectively, coming directly after Rocannon's World I made a mistake and read City of Illusions first, leading to some easily resolved confusion (that wouldn't have existed at all, had I been careful), and I was surprised to find the story set on Terra of all places. After reading it and learning of my mistake, I went directly to Planet, which was more familiar (ha!) territory: an alien planet. Both were beautifully-written, leading me to feel like barfing out of sheer awe. I've only got one more Hainish book left, and this is kind of breaking my heart.

Dead Souls by Nikolai Gogol was an interesting romp through both the Russian countryside, (older) society, and character design. It was a bit difficult to get through because of its density, but also because its POV character is deliberately written to be a repellent man. The annoying thing about this book though, is that it is unfinished and parts prior to the "end" are also missing. It's an interesting introduction to the Russian novel, and I'm pretty excited to get through a few more.

The Sirens of Titan by Kurt Vonnegut is the first Vonnegut novel I've ever read. The style is really interesting! The theme of the book is even more interesting, one that obviously influenced a lot of media that came after it. I don't want to bust the surprise, but it's of a pile-up of great things. Depressing things that make you think about free will, but great things.


Now reading:
Why Be Happy When You Can Be Normal by Jeanette Winterson

Reading Next:

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Manila Noir edited by Jessica Hagedorn
The Telling by Ursula K. Le Guin

Next twenty:

1. The Garden of Evening Mists by Tan Twan Eng
2. Notes From a Small Island by Bill Bryson
3. Jamrach's Menagerie by Carol Birch
4. Catch-22 by Joseph Heller
5. Tam Lin by Pamela Dean
6. Prospero Lost by L. Jagi Lamplighter
7. Elantris by Brandon Sanderson
8. Servant of the Underworld by Aliette Bodard
9. The Scar by China Mieville
10. S by J. J. Abrams and Doug Dorst
11. Parasite by Mira Grant
12. Babayaga by Toby Barlow
13. The Dragon Charmer by Jan Siegel
14. Happiness Like Water by Chinelo Okparanta
15. The Name of the Wind by Patrick Ness
16. The Forever War by Joe Haldeman
17. Blood, Bones, and Butter by Gabrielle Hamilton
18. Perelandra by C.S. Lewis
19. Galaxy in Flames by Ben Counter
20. The Decline and Fall by Evelyn Waugh